What’s Up Doc? –  Birds of Prey Wildlife Rehabilitation

What’s Up Doc? – Birds of Prey Wildlife Rehabilitation

The sky as well as birds of prey abound at Paris Landing State Park.   Dr. Jessica Claudio reports for duty after “flying solo” to a surprise #wildlife rescue at the East Tennessee Region Board of Christian Education #CYYAW17 event in Paris, Tennessee.   Absolutely breath-taking, a weekend in fellowship and communion at the Paris Landing State Park gives one a break from everyday life.  While preparing for a Sweetest Day Workshop to make Valentine’s for the nursing home, I met Park Ranger Lowry, whose many similarities to my own interests fit like a glove.  We exchanged information to meet up after my church service, which concluded the following morning. Not one to miss out on a good time, I met up with wildlife Park Ranger Lowry to offer my veterinary support and assistance with a patient of the furless variety.   A cooper’s hawk was rescued and brought to the Paris Landing State Park Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, and was treated and helped by us shortly after the sermon. “This is the day that the Lord has made – let us rejoice and be glad in it” comes to mind for that glorious Sunday, when we worked under the wildlife rehabilitation project coordinator in order to manage the now healing wound of a Cooper’s Hawk, together at Paris Landing State Park. Paris Landing State Park Wildlife Rehabilitation Center is currently under construction in an expansion project called, “The Birds of Prey Habitat”.   The Birds of Prey Habitat is being built under contributors to the Tennessee State Parks project, including but not limited to: Mr. Froddrill, Gina Lowry, Friends of Paris Landing...
Travels with Your Cat and Dog

Travels with Your Cat and Dog

Planning for holiday travels with your cat and dog? With the fall holidays just ahead of us, it is just the time to take a quick trip to see the family. If you are planning a trip, and traveling with your dog and cat, here are 10 handy tips for to road. Traveling with your Cat and Dog 1. Separation When traveling with multiple pets it is helpful to make sure they are separated for easy maneuverability on your drive. This allows easy access to a specific pet that needs your attention during the drive. 2. Food Ensure that any caffeinated beverages, gum and fast food are not in the vicinity of your pets. 3. Small Objects Take a quick look at the surroundings around your cage or carrier. Small objects such as lose screws, strings, nails, or rubber bands can cause major problems for your kitty if ingested. It is easy to miss seeing a small object like this without looking for them. 4. Hard Pet Carrier If this is a short trip, consider using a hard pet carrier for your cat. This will avoid harm of your pet and yourself during transport. In my article yesterday I mentioned to never put anything past an anxious cat. It would be dangerous if the cat chews through a soft carrier during the drive. Finally if you are stacking suitcases or objects in the car the last thing you want to do is have something fall on a soft pet carrier during the trip. 5. Keep Pets Occupied To alleviate stress from the trip make sure your pet’s travel areas are comfortable. Include blankets...
Flying with Your Cat Onboard

Flying with Your Cat Onboard

Have you ever thought about flying with your cat when traveling? My husband and I were flying home from a vacation when we heard over the airplane speakers, “There is an emergency with an animal. Are there any veterinarians on the plane?” As I had just graduated veterinary school and was not practicing, I was sure there was someone more qualified than I, to take the call.  Five minutes later, the flight attendant repeated the message. I appeared to be the only saving grace. I walked up the aisle to find a young couple traveling with a stressed out cat.  The cat had anxiously managed to chew through his cloth pet carrier and was sitting with big eyes in his pet mother’s lap. The couple looked up at me and asked if I could pill their cat.  I said I could, but would need someone to restrain him because cats don’t often take well to being pilled. Sure enough, the cat’s reaction to the pill was sheer terror.  The cat managed to jump out of the pet owner’s arms STRAIGHT AT THE FACES of the man and woman sitting behind them.  Luckily, the owner was quick enough to catch the cat in mid air. Next, the cat used the owner’s lap as a trampoline and diverted it’s escape underneath the seat of two people across the aisle a few rows ahead of us. The owners were frantic. The cat in face people were stunned. The people that the cat ran at next were frantic. That poor terrified feline soul was in a state of utter anxiety. Retrieving the cat from under the...
Traveling with Your Dogs- Travel Animal Doctor

Traveling with Your Dogs- Travel Animal Doctor

If you are planning to travel with your dogs, there are some things you should keep in mind. Are you planning a long road trip with your dogs? After years of traveling with dogs, I have learned there are some essential things to bring along. Follow along for 13 quick veterinary tips for traveling with your dog: 1. Buckle Up Safety first! Remember to put on their seat belts before you start your drive. When dogs get excited they may try to get in the front seat with you or impede your driving. 2. Car Seat Covers Are you concerned about getting fur all over your clothes? Do you pick up friends in your car and get embarrassed with the fur they get on their clothes from your car? Avoid getting hair all over the backseat by purchasing a car seat cover for your car. 3. Portable Water There are a number of bowls that you can keep in your car so that when you are on the move, your car can stay hydrated. I have seen a number of water bowls made out of material that can easily fit in a a car seat pocket. We use a water bottle with a lid that turns into a bowl from which Jade can drink. We also keep a collapsible bowl in a car seat back pocket. 4. Avoid Toxins Prevent unintentional pet poisoning. Make sure gum, fast food, and caffeinated drinks are not in the same vicinity as your canine friends. 5. Air Conditioning Keep your pets cool. You can avoid overheating by ensuring plentiful airflow to your puppy dogs. 7. Bathroom...
9 Quick Tips for taking Extra Long Road Trips with your Cats

9 Quick Tips for taking Extra Long Road Trips with your Cats

When traveling involves taking your cats along, it can become difficult when you need to take extra long road trips with your cats.   Not only do you need to be concerned with the road, but you also have to make sure that your cats are safe throughout the road trip. Just as significant as keeping your cats safe, is the age old dilemma of where your cats are going to go to the bathroom. While you and human passengers can just stop at a gas station, it is not as easy for your furry feline counterparts. A cat should not have to hold his or her bladder during long trips. It is important to give your cat access to a litter box on the road. Forcing your cat to “hold it” can cause bladder infections. If you have kittens, their bladders will be even smaller. Besides the problem of where will your pet pee, you do not want to deprive him of water during the long trip. Your cats should stay hydrate and cool throughout the trip. Avoid overheating by ensuring air circulation is always present for your pets. Supply water in a bowl that cannot spill to avoid dehydration. Here are nine quick tips for what to remember when you need to hit the road with your felines in the backseat. 1. Cage Fit a cage large enough for your cat/cats in the backseat, with a litter box and water. Water Bowl Use a bowl that can hook to the side of the cage to avoid water spilling. 3. Water Bring extra water in case you need to refill the bowl throughout...
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