Great Falls Nature Hike – Travel Animal Doctor

Great Falls Nature Hike – Travel Animal Doctor

A family hike to the Great Falls National Park proved to be a successful “Great Falls Nature Hike”. – Travel Animal Doctor Many woodland friends greeted us on our journey on the Great Falls Nature Hike. I enjoyed practicing my photography skills, while my husband and Jade enjoyed a run. Toad The toad in the first picture was fearless. I was able to get extremely close as he sat supremely in his “lair” between two roots of a tree. Skink The second photograph, I was unable to get close. There was a family surrounding the little guy and I did not want to risk scaring it away with a photo, when the family was having fun watching it run around. If you look at the middle left of the picture, at the up ridden tree root/stump very carefully, you may see a very small skink. It was having a good old time running around the fallen tree. Box Turtle Next we came across a box turtle. This turtle was in the middle of the path. Very recently I saw a few posts on found box turtles and turtles with cracked shells and wanted to remind other hikers and nature enthusiasts of the importance to let these box turtles remain in their home range. When turtles are removed from their habitat and brought to someone’s backyard, they will leave as soon as they can to return to their natural home. In doing so, they will cross streets and can easily get ran over by a vehicle, and cannot live with their broken shell. The turtle shell protects their organs, and it cannot...
Cranial Cruciate Ligament Tear – Travel Animal Doctor

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Tear – Travel Animal Doctor

Thoughts of an ACL tear were on my mind this weekend when my friend took a fall. -Travel Animal Doctor She had similar clinical signs that a dog would have with a cranial cruciate ligament tear.  As I went on a hike with my husband and furry friend, I could not stop thinking about the disease, so I finally decided to come home and write about it. A cranial cruciate ligament tear is a common problem in large breed dogs, like our lab, Jade. This disease is simply put, a torn cranial cruciate ligament in the knee of your pet. In humans the term is anterior cruciate ligament, but in dogs, the same ligament is commonly referred to as the cranial cruciate ligament. Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease: So what types of dogs often get a torn cranial cruciate ligament, and how can it occur? This disease can occur quickly or progress into a disease process A torn CCL occurs most often in Labs (like Jade), Staffordshire terriers, Rottweilers and Newfoundlands Your dog is at increased risk if it is overweight. How would you know if your pet may have a torn CCL? Is your dog holding up one back leg or favoring one back leg over the other? When your dog is hiking with you does “limping” get worse? Does one knee appear to be bigger than the other or do the two back legs look different from one another in size or character? What other diseases will a veterinarian have to rule out? There are many other problems that can occur which cause your dog to look similarly discomfortable. A few examples of...
6 Safe Urban Pet Travel Tips from a Traveling Animal Doctor

6 Safe Urban Pet Travel Tips from a Traveling Animal Doctor

These 6 Safe Urban Pet Travel Tips from a traveling animal doctor will make your next pet-friendly visit to Washington D.C. a delightful experience.  My husband and I decided to take our dog, Jade, to see the national monuments. It was extremely busy and made me realize the importance of preparation when taking pets to a populated event. I have brainstormed and compiled some tips to try for safe city travel with your pet. 1) Buckle up. City driving is very hectic, and often there is intense traffic. Safe pet transport is important to avoid stress on your pet, yourself, and ensure that you get to your destination safely. There are many seat belts for dogs that are relatively cheap (as little as $20). If you have a small pet a pet carrier can work as well. With quick stop and go driving, your pet may get hurt or hurt someone else if he or she is not secured appropriately. 2) Bring water. There are many dog friendly places that may have accessible water for your pet. With the proper research you may be able to find pet friendly places with water sources. Remember that you never know when a pet friendly water source may be in need of repair.   Even if you are able to buy a water bottle not every pet knows how to drink from one. There are keychain collapsible water bowls that can fit on or in a travel bag quite easily. Additionally, there are bottles with lids that fold out to form a bowl for your pet to drink from. These are just a few ideas of...
7 Veterinary Facts About Your Pet’s Dental Hygiene- Travel Animal Doctor

7 Veterinary Facts About Your Pet’s Dental Hygiene- Travel Animal Doctor

Your pet’s dental hygiene is an important topic in the veterinary and pet care industry. -Travel Animal Doctor Ultimately, just like in humans, pet’s teeth should be brushed twice a day. Read “Your Pet’s Teeth” for a brief overview on the importance of dental hygiene in your pet. This article will give you seven veterinary facts about your pet’s dental hygiene. 1) Disease Shortcomings in pet dental care can lead to serious disease processes including brain, kidney, liver and heart disease. Oral disease alone can be critically debilitating to your pet. Bacteria and yellow plaque collect on the gums of an animal’s teeth. Without removal, this plaque becomes concrete tartar or calculus that often needs to be scaled away rather than brushed. Plaque and calculus builds up along the gum line, leading to gum inflammation and loss of periodontal attachment leading to gum disease. Gum disease is commonly called periodontal disease (literally meaning “disease around the tooth”). Gum inflammation causes pockets to appear between the gum line and teeth, where bacteria dive into causing further progression of disease. The bacteria from the plaque also cause a rancid smell in your pet’s mouth. Bacterial sequestration can cause insufferable pain. Teeth are lost; abscesses form and the mouth can fester with infection. Periodontal disease alone causes immense oral discomfort and pain that may lead to difficulties for your pet to even pick up food. If gum disease is far enough along, the jawbone can actually be destroyed, making pathologic jaw fracture a likely result. A jaw fracture that is pathologic means that the fracture resulted from disease. If your pet is...
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