Travel Animal Doctor: Crock Pot Macaroni and Cheese

Travel Animal Doctor: Crock Pot Macaroni and Cheese

This delicious Crock Pot Macaroni and Cheese recipe was given to me by my husband’s mother, Mrs. Miller. – Travel Animal Doctor I had extra fun preparing the dish because since we just moved in not too long ago I could not find our big crockpot. Instead I used this small crockpot, and the food was overflowing! If you do the full recipe a large crockpot is needed. Alas, I got some pictures of the finished product, and it was absolutely amazing! Cooking time: 3 hrs 45 min Ingredients: 8 oz macaroni cooked 4 cups cheddar cheese 12 oz can evaporated milk 2 eggs whisked 1 ½ c. milk ½ stick melted butter Salt, pepper, paprika Instructions: Put crock pot on low. Add cooked macaroni, 3 cups cheese, evaporated milk, eggs, milk, butter, salt, pepper and mix. Sprinkle last cup of cheese on top and paprika, keep on low and cook for 3 hrs 45 minutes. Crust will form on edges. Best macaroni and cheese. My Take on the Recipe You may see a hint of green bean below the macaroni and cheese in the picture because my husband mixed the two up when he ate it. This mac and cheese paired perfectly with the green beans. The recipe is our go to recipe when we are craving cheese. Sometimes we also cut up vegetarian hot dogs to mix in the mac and cheese. Other times we eat the hot dogs as a quick main dish and eat the mac and cheese as a nice side dish alongside of green beans or another tasty vegetable such as corn. With the addition of...
7 Veterinary Facts About Your Pet’s Dental Hygiene- Travel Animal Doctor

7 Veterinary Facts About Your Pet’s Dental Hygiene- Travel Animal Doctor

Your pet’s dental hygiene is an important topic in the veterinary and pet care industry. -Travel Animal Doctor Ultimately, just like in humans, pet’s teeth should be brushed twice a day. Read “Your Pet’s Teeth” for a brief overview on the importance of dental hygiene in your pet. This article will give you seven veterinary facts about your pet’s dental hygiene. 1) Disease Shortcomings in pet dental care can lead to serious disease processes including brain, kidney, liver and heart disease. Oral disease alone can be critically debilitating to your pet. Bacteria and yellow plaque collect on the gums of an animal’s teeth. Without removal, this plaque becomes concrete tartar or calculus that often needs to be scaled away rather than brushed. Plaque and calculus builds up along the gum line, leading to gum inflammation and loss of periodontal attachment leading to gum disease. Gum disease is commonly called periodontal disease (literally meaning “disease around the tooth”). Gum inflammation causes pockets to appear between the gum line and teeth, where bacteria dive into causing further progression of disease. The bacteria from the plaque also cause a rancid smell in your pet’s mouth. Bacterial sequestration can cause insufferable pain. Teeth are lost; abscesses form and the mouth can fester with infection. Periodontal disease alone causes immense oral discomfort and pain that may lead to difficulties for your pet to even pick up food. If gum disease is far enough along, the jawbone can actually be destroyed, making pathologic jaw fracture a likely result. A jaw fracture that is pathologic means that the fracture resulted from disease. If your pet is...
Travel Animal Doctor: World Health Day

Travel Animal Doctor: World Health Day

World Health Day is today, and food safety is the topic of the day. -Travel Animal Doctor But food is not the only daily requirement that, contaminated, can be harmful and may harbor disease. People have probably heard stories about waterborne diseases in developing countries, but it also occurs right at your back door. How would you feel if you stopped by the gas station for some coffee on the way to work, and was unable to get it because the water in the city was bad? This is what happened to a man going through Toledo, Ohio in August. In August 2014, 287,500 inhabitants of Toledo, Ohio were unable to drink their own water due to insurmountable algae blooms in their watershed for days. The algae bloom produces toxins that are deadly to humans. The algae also block the sunlight, causing death and stagnant growth to grasses in the water. These grasses provide habitats to shellfish and fish, and are a food source for waterfowl. As the algae dies, it decomposes at the bottom of the basin and depletes the water of oxygen. This oxygen is necessary for the survival of animals living in the environment, including eastern hellbenders, giant salamanders native to the Ohio watersheds. As a fortunate extern at the Toledo Zoo, I stumbled upon a conservation project that should be well recognized for its efforts. This project helps hellbenders throughout Ohio, and utilizes their populations in watersheds as early indicators of polluted waterways. The Toledo Zoo has successfully reared Eastern hellbenders, to be released into cleaned up watersheds around Ohio. There had been drastic decline of...
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